Welcome to Space @ Virginia Tech

Space@VT Celebrates RockSat-X Launch

RockSat-X launched early Wednesday, August 17, 2016 and carried a payload designed by Virginia Tech students. The payload experiment was a great success, sending data from 153km over the Atlantic Ocean all the way back to the Virginia Tech Ground Station (VTGS). More info coming soon.

Space @ Virginia Tech Introduces New Faculty Members

Dr. Mark Psiaki

Dr. Mark Psiaki

Dr. Mark L. Psiaki recently joined AOE as Professor and Kevin Crofton Faculty Chair.  He comes to VT after a 30 year stint in Cornell's School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering.  His office and primary research home will be Space@VT.  His research interests are in the areas of Spacecraft attitude and orbit determination; GPS signal processing, navigation applications, and security; general estimation and filtering; remote sensing of the upper atmosphere and related inverse problems; and dynamic modeling of satellites, rockets, aircraft, and wheeled vehicles.

Dr. Colin Adams

Dr. Colin Adams

Research Focus:

Aerospace and Fusion Plasmas, Aerodynamics.

Education:

Bachelor's degree: 2005, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering, University of Washington

Education (continued):

Master's Degree: 2009, Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington

Doctoral Degree: 2015, Engineering, University of New Mexico


Dr. Jonathan Black

Dr. Jonathan T. Black

Research focus:

Space systems, advanced lightweight aerospace structures, autonomous vehicles, advanced sensing technology, and novel orbital analysis.

Education :

Bachelor’s degree: Industrial engineering with an international minor in French studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Master’s degree: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University

Doctoral degree: 

Mechanical Engineering, University of Kentucky


Dr. Michael Hartinger

Dr. Michael Hartinger

Research Focus:

Plasma waves, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, radiation belts, space weather.

Education:

Doctoral degree: 

Geophysics and Space Physics, UCLA, 2012

Bachelor's degree: 

Physics, Cornell University, 2006


Dr. Bhuvana Srinivasan

Dr. Bhuvana Srinivasan

Research focus:

Advanced space propulsion, nuclear fusion, hypersonics, space plasmas, and computational plasma physics.

Education:

Bachelor’s degree: aerospace and mechanical engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT)

Education (continued):

Master's degree: aeronautics and astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle

Doctoral degree: aeronautics and astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle


Dr. Joseph Baker Receives W.S. "Pete" White Award in Engineering Education

Dr. Joseph Baker Receives W.S. "Pete" White Award in Engineering Education

Congratulations to Dr. Joseph Baker on receiving the W.S. "Pete" White Award in Engineering Education at the 18th annual Dean's Awards Reception on April 28, 2015. 


Dr. J. Michael Ruohoniemi named Faculty Fellow

Dr. J. Michael Ruohoniemi named Faculty Fellow

Congratulations to Dr. J. Michael Ruohoniemi on being named a Faculty Fellow at the 18th annual Dean's Awards Reception on April 28, 2015.

NSF

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)


News Highlights

Dr. Scott Bailey

Congratulations to Dr. Scott Bailey on being tenured at the rank of Professor.


Scientists Map Temperature and Density in Earth's Exosphere

Data from multiple orbiters give a clearer picture of how density and temperature interact and what that could mean for future satellite missions, read more.


Protecting GPS From Spoofers Is Critical to the Future of Navigation

GPS is vulnerable to spoofing attacks. Here’s how we can defend these important navigation signals, read more.


Evan Thomas
Evan Thomas Successfully Defends His Doctoral Dissertation

VT SuperDARN student Evan Thomas defended his doctoral disseration on Tuesday, February 15, to an examining committee of six professors. He is advised by Drs. Jo Baker and Mike Ruohoniemi, read more.
3dprint_10-15
VT students launch experimental 3D printer on NASA rocket ship from Wallops Island

How would a 3-D printer work in the microgravity of suborbital space after surviving a jarring ride 100 miles above the earth?

A group of Virginia Tech College of Engineering students hope to have an answer after a launch at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, read more.